Rasmussen’s Encephalitis Presenting as Progressive Parietal Dysfunction Sans Seizures

Rasmussen’s encephalitis (RE) is a rare immune-mediated condition that classically presents in children with focal epilepsy or epilepsia partialis continua, progressive hemiplegia associated with cognitive deterioration and chronic unilateral cortical inflammation and hemi-atrophy [1]. Adults may have atypical manifestations including a prolonged prodromal phase, poorly defined residual period and slower progression [2]. Adults have more frequent occipital lobe involvement, bilateral hemispheric involvement or presentation as temporal lobe epilepsy or movement disorders [3].

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Dissecting the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of early childhood-onset generalized epilepsies

After Doose et al. [1] described epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizure (MAE), exploration of genetic causes has been ongoing [2]. Recent studies have identified pathogenic variants in SLC2A1 and SLC6A1 in 4% and 5% of MAE patients, respectively [3,4]. SLC2A1 has also been identified as responsible for up to 10% of early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) patients [5–7]. Similarly, EOAE and childhood absence epilepsy have also been reported in patients with pathogenic variants in SLC6A1 [8]. Therefore, although the principal seizure ...

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A case of DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) under treatment with eslicarbazepine

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a well-known and often limiting problem in the pharmacological treatment of epilepsies. Cutaneous drug reactions – ranging from mild maculopapular exanthema (MPE) to severe Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) are frequently observed in association with several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) [1]. DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a potentially life-threatening subtype that features hypereosinophilia, morbilliform skin eruptions, fever, facial edema, enlarged lymph nodes and other organ involvement and occurs with a latency ...

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Epilepsy in China: Factors influencing Marriage Status and fertility

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures affecting various aspects of social life [1,2]. It is generally agreed that patients with epilepsy (PWE) are less likely to get married and bear offspring [3–6]. Lower marriage rates and reduced fertility within marriage may be associated with sociological and clinical characteristics of epilepsy [5,7,8]. PWE have lower rates of marriage when disease onset in their first decade of life [3,5]. Carran et al. found that patients with temporal lobe epilepsy ...

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Cognitive outcome of pediatric epilepsy surgery across ages and different types of surgeries: A monocentric 1-year follow-up study in 306 patients of school age

Pediatric patients with epilepsy for whom epilepsy surgery is a treatment option very often profit from this intervention in terms of becoming seizure free. However, while seizure freedom can be achieved in many patients, the eventual neuropsychological costs of successful and even more important of non-successful surgery represent a relevant issue under discussion. Neuropsychological impairments are almost present when epilepsy starts already, they can increase with ongoing epilepsy, and surgery may add to this [1–4].

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Convulsive status epilepticus due to neurocysticercosis: Clinical profile

Seizures and epilepsy are the most common manifestations of all the evolutionary stages of NCC (78.8%, 95% CI: 65.1%-89.7%) [1]. The seizure presentation can be an isolated seizure, seizures in cluster, and convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) [2,3]. CSE is an extremely rare presentation of all the evolutionary stages of NCC [2–5]. Extremely rarely CSE due to NCC may evolve into super refractory SE [6]. However because of its rarity, CSE due to NCC has not been well characterized, hence this ...

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Rashes and Other Hypersensitivity Reactions Associated with Antiepileptic Drugs: A Review of Current Literature

Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are associated with rashes and other hypersensitivity reactions. The incidence varies depending on the type of rash, the AED used, and the previous history of rash with quoted incidences ranging from 1.7 -8.8%. Drugs with the greatest risk include phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and lamotrigine, while several other AEDs have a risk < 1% [1,2]. AEDs are commonly used in adult and pediatric patients with epilepsy (PWE), pain, and behavioral health problems [3]. It is important to understand ...

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Efficacy of Statin Therapy in Post-Stroke Seizure Prophylaxis: Clues from an Observational Study of Routine Secondary Prevention Treatment

Stroke is a common cause of epilepsy in the elderly population. The abnormal neuronal discharges of post-stroke seizures (PSS) can cause damage to neurons and worsen the outcome of stroke. Numerous studies have focused on the clinical epidemiology of PSS; and the reported incidence varies from 2% to 20%, depending on the study population, stroke subtype, and the seizure onset time after the stroke [1–4]. Patients with early-onset seizures (ES) have a high risk of disability and mortality [1,5], whereas ...

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Parasagittal Hemispherotomy in hemispheric Polymicrogyria with electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep: Indications, Results and Follow-up

Polymicrogyria is one of the most frequently occurring brain malformation and is characterized by an excessive number of small gyri associated with lamination abnormalities (either a four layer lamination or a dyslamination). PMG is a heterogeneous malformation with variable localizations within the brain. An overview of all the topographic types of PMG shows that unilateral hemispheric PMGs are rare (2/328) [1].

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