Welfare consequences for people with epilepsy and their partners: A matched nationwide study in Denmark

Epilepsy is a common and chronic neurological disorder affecting approximately 1% of people of all ages [1,2]. Despite diagnostic and therapeutic improvements, refractory epilepsy is relatively frequent and, due to significant comorbidity, is still one of the most common serious brain disorders worldwide. Epilepsy is associated with social stigma, psychosocial adversities, and reduced quality of life for patients and their caregivers and, thus, has a substantial socioeconomic impact [3–6].

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The debate: Treatment after the first seizure–The PRO

According to current diagnosis criteria, first seizures constitute beginning epilepsy when they carry recurrence risks of ≥60% over the next 10 years. This is frequently the case and warrants AED treatment. Evidence argues against deferring treatment when provoking factors such as sleep deprivation are reported. There are several characteristics of first seizures which markedly increase recurrence risk but not clearly beyond 60%. This includes status epilepticus or seizure flurries at first manifestation or focal semiology indicating focal epilepsy.

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Tolerability of Lacosamide or Zonisamide in elderly patients with seizures

Epilepsy is most prevalent in elderly patients especially after the age of 60 and reaching a prevalence rate of approximately 1.5% by age 75 [1,2]. As the world’s population is aging and the number of people living after the age of 60 is increasing, so will the prevalence of epilepsy. Although it is generally easier to control seizures in this age group, the age-related physiological changes can alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties of anti-seizure medications (ASMs) making them less ...

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Tolerability of Lacosamide or Zonisamide in elderly patients with seizures

Epilepsy is most prevalent in elderly patients especially after the age of 60 and reaching a prevalence rate of approximately 1.5% by age 75 [1,2]. As the world’s population is aging and the number of people living after the age of 60 is increasing, so will the prevalence of epilepsy. Although it is generally easier to control seizures in this age group, the age-related physiological changes can alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties of anti-seizure medications (ASMs) making them less ...

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